Magazines & books

In Almost Every Picture 16 – Sexy Sofa

In Almost Every Picture 16 – Sexy Sofa

In Almost Every Picture 16 – Sexy Sofa

In Almost Every Picture 16 - Sexy Sofa | By Erik Kessels

In Almost Every Picture 16 - Sexy Sofa | We like to christen our stuff; our kids, our boats, a new home. Often we celebrate when we use something for the first time, to mark the occasion and its appearance in our lives. There are traditional ways to do this, and then the not so familiar, personal rites of passage we create for ourselves and our things. In 1965 Noud and Ruby decided to pimp up their living room. They refurnished the fire place opting for a conical, mid-century design that resembles a witches hat. The second new addition was a sofa; a tufted corner piece in a classy shade of beige velveteen. Not a right angled design but a soft sensual curve snaking around the corner of the room. Not to mention, it had tassels. Unsurprisingly, Noud and Ruby were smitten with their revamped living room and wanted to give it a christening all of their own… Their new home improvements set the scene for what became a sincere and erotic collaboration between Noud and Ruby that spanned almost 10 years, documenting fashion and fantasy and ultimately prompting us to ask ourselves: who are we behind closed doors and what sides of ours identities do we choose to conceal, even if they give us pleasure and satisfaction. These images were never intended to be revealed beyond the walls of their living room and yet now we have them in front of us. And that’s one of the wonderful things about photography; it gives us control over our legacy, of how we want to be portrayed and what imprint of ourselves we want to leave behind. Through Noud’s camera Ruby becomes a star taking centre-stage. Yet in almost every picture, the repeat performances of the sofa and the fireplace elevate them to co-star status. These inanimate characters don’t need to say anything because their presence does enough, for where would Ruby be without them. Erik Kessels is an expert in photographic coincidence. Always on the lookout for beauty and a healthy dose of absurdism, he obsessively collects the pictures that others throw in the bin. This has resulted in a wonderful series of publications: IN ALMOST EVERY PICTURE. www.kesselskramerpublishing.com www.erikkessels.com
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In Almost Every Picture 15

In Almost Every Picture 15

Erik Kessels is an expert in photographic coincidence. Always on the lookout for beauty and a healthy dose of absurdism, he obsessively collects the pictures that others throw in the bin. This has resulted in a wonderful series of publications: IN ALMOST EVERY PICTURE. This fifteenth issue in this series, with photographs from the Horus archive, Sandor Kardos, could easily be described as 'not in every picture, in fact, in no picture at all.' A woman censored the images of ex-girlfriends of her husband as if she wants to say: “He’s mine”. EDITED BY ERIK KESSELS. PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE HORUS ARCHIVE, SANDOR KARDOS. BLACK AND WHITE - SEPIA, 15.5 X 20 CM, 148 PAGES, SOFTCOVER. PUBLISHED BY KESSELSKRAMER, AMSTERDAM, 2019.
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In Almost Every Picture 8 – gift

In Almost Every Picture 8 – gift

Collected & edited by Erik Kessels, photographs by Hironori Akutagawa, text by Christian Bunyan. In almost every picture #8 continues this well-established series of found photography books. Its subject is one of the earliest successful photo blogs, a site documenting the story of Oolong, a Japanese rabbit whose unusually flat head made it ideal for balancing objects. Starting in 1999, hundreds of images were posted by Oolong’s owner,  Hironori Akutagawa, each showing this otherwise ordinary creature with an unusual item placed squarely on his skull. The items in question range from rabbit bones to cakes, teapots and other household objects, always shot in low res, almost always from the same angle. Now in book form, Oolong's images chart the story of a unique friendship between man and bunny. Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 120 pages, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 7 Updated – gift

In Almost Every Picture 7 Updated – gift

In Almost Every Picture 7 - updated edition collected & edited by Erik Kessels and Joep Eijkens.

Thanks to Ria van Dijk. For 80 years Ria has been bang on target. To mark this impressive milestone In Almost Every Picture 7 is being re-released this year in the form of a special anniversary edition with eight new shots and an exhibition in Tilburg. Ria van Dijk shot her first photo at the Tilburg fair in 1936 when she was 16 years old. It started at in Ria’s hometown of Tilburg, but throughout the years she followed the fair from town to town. It became a tradition and Ria continued shooting (guns and photos) year after year. And the bullseye is that Ria kept every single photo as if they were her trophies. In 2008 Erik Kessels and Joep Eijkens collected Ria's photographs in the book 'in almost every picture 7’.  In 2016 Ria returned to the fair and on July 22nd she shot her 80th photo at the opening of the Tilburgse Kermis. For the occasion, KesselsKramer and City Marketing Tilburg publish this celebratory updated edition of In almost every picture 7. Colour / black & white, 155 x 200 mm, 136 pages, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 6 – gift

In Almost Every Picture 6 – gift

Collected & edited by Erik Kessels. The impulse to mark our lives is universal. Start a diary, build a house, write a poem. The proliferation of online blogs in our own time is testament to the desire to cry, "Hey, I exist. This is me." By collecting and documenting her passport photographs over some sixty years, the woman in this book demarcated her life in black and white, declaring her existence (even if only to herself). It is difficult to imagine a more minimalist autobiography, a lifetime compressed into just 75 extremely similar photographs.
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In Almost Every Picture 2 – gift

In Almost Every Picture 2 – gift

Collected & Edited by Erik Kessels and Andrea Stultiens. Kessels and Stultiens have delved into the treasure trove of vernacular photography. They found a remarkable series of photographs taken by a taxi driver of one passenger only. The passenger and the taxi are pictured in front of mountains, fields, sunsets, city squares, highway rest stops. What were they doing there? Who was she? Why did she travel like this? Colour, 160 x 200mm, 224 pages, Saddle stitched, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 7 – Updated

In Almost Every Picture 7 – Updated

In Almost Every Picture 7 - updated edition collected & edited by Erik Kessels and Joep Eijkens.

Thanks to Ria van Dijk. For 80 years Ria has been bang on target. To mark this impressive milestone ‘in almost every picture 7’ is being re-released this year in the form of a special anniversary edition with eight new shots and an exhibition in Tilburg. Ria van Dijk shot her first photo at the Tilburg fair in 1936 when she was 16 years old. It started at in Ria’s hometown of Tilburg, but throughout the years she followed the fair from town to town. It became a tradition and Ria continued shooting (guns and photos) year after year. And the bullseye is that Ria kept every single photo as if they were her trophies. In 2008 Erik Kessels and Joep Eijkens collected Ria's photographs in the book 'in almost every picture 7’.  In 2016 Ria returned to the fair and on July 22nd she shot her 80th photo at the opening of the Tilburgse Kermis. For the occasion, KesselsKramer and City Marketing Tilburg publish this celebratory updated edition of In almost every picture 7. Colour / black & white, 155 x 200 mm, 136 pages, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 13

In Almost Every Picture 13

This is a short history of photography’s most common mistake: part of the photographer’s hand appearing in frame.

In Almost Every Picture the pages trace an error that hasn’t dimmed with the digital era, but appears as widespread now as it was back in the form’s black-and-white prehistory. Our tour covers family snaps from the standard “say cheese” portrait to a straight-laced grandmother playing a very un­-straight laced game of poker. It encompasses holiday snaps and seventies hair and smiles soaked in decades-old sunshine. But whoever they are, whenever they are, our subjects are weirdly cropped by thumbs, sometimes fingers, occasionally a whole palm. Digits loom massive; mysterious blurs like a ghost or UFO drifting into shot. - Edited and designed by Erik Kessels. Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 180 pages, soft cover. ISBN 978-90-70478-39-1
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In Almost Every Picture 14

In Almost Every Picture 14

The fourteenth edition of Erik Kessels’ found photography series presents a semi-nude detective story: who chopped the heads off all the sunbathers? This latest series was discovered in the late eighties by the photographer Toon Michiels. Edited & designed by Erik Kessels. Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 148 pages, soft cover. ISBN 978-90-70478-41-4
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In Almost Every Picture 8

In Almost Every Picture 8

Collected & edited by Erik Kessels, photographs by Hironori Akutagawa, text by Christian Bunyan. In almost every picture #8 continues this well-established series of found photography books. Its subject is one of the earliest successful photo blogs, a site documenting the story of Oolong, a Japanese rabbit whose unusually flat head made it ideal for balancing objects. Starting in 1999, hundreds of images were posted by Oolong’s owner,  Hironori Akutagawa, each showing this otherwise ordinary creature with an unusual item placed squarely on his skull. The items in question range from rabbit bones to cakes, teapots and other household objects, always shot in low res, almost always from the same angle. Now in book form, Oolong's images chart the story of a unique friendship between man and bunny. Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 120 pages, soft cover.
read more >
In Almost Every Picture 6

In Almost Every Picture 6

Collected & edited by Erik Kessels. The impulse to mark our lives is universal. Start a diary, build a house, write a poem. The proliferation of online blogs in our own time is testament to the desire to cry, "Hey, I exist. This is me." By collecting and documenting her passport photographs over some sixty years, the woman in this book demarcated her life in black and white, declaring her existence (even if only to herself). It is difficult to imagine a more minimalist autobiography, a lifetime compressed into just 75 extremely similar photographs.
read more >
In Almost Every Picture 4

In Almost Every Picture 4

Collected & Edited by Erik Kessels. Two sisters, sororal twins, grow up right before our eyes, diligently arranging dresses, coats, belts, shoes, gloves and often hairstyles that are identical. We see them promenading and posing for the camera in Barcelona during World War II. At a certain moment the tragedy of war manages to invade the photographs. We see a space left for the twin sister and we can only imagine what the cause of her absence could be. Black & white, 160 x 200mm, 184 pages, Saddle stitched, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 2

In Almost Every Picture 2

Collected & Edited by Erik Kessels and Andrea Stultiens. Kessels and Stultiens have delved into the treasure trove of vernacular photography. They found a remarkable series of photographs taken by a taxi driver of one passenger only. The passenger and the taxi are pictured in front of mountains, fields, sunsets, city squares, highway rest stops. What were they doing there? Who was she? Why did she travel like this? Colour, 160 x 200mm, 224 pages, Saddle stitched, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 11

In Almost Every Picture 11

Edited and designed by Erik Kessels. Photographs by Fred Clark. This eleventh edition of in almost every picture is entirely dedicated to photographs from Fred and Valerie. A couple from Florida who share a passion for “wet fun adventure”. One is the photographer, the other is the model and the water is the medium. No matter what they are wearing or what they are doing; they take every opportunity to get wet, the more spontaneous the better. Public or private, silk or leather, winter or summer none of these elements matter. The adventure is all of these elements combined. Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 160 pages, soft cover.
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In Almost Every Picture 10

In Almost Every Picture 10

Collected by Michel Campeau. Edited and designed by Erik Kessels. This edition is the result of a strange detective story, initiated by photographer Michel Campeau. While clearing out his mother's house, Campeau discovered a strange image amongst her possessions: a piglet in a restaurant, being fed milk by a customer. Some time later, he stumbled across another, similar picture by accident. Intrigued, Campeau decided to seek out more of these piglet mascots. His quest yielded over 200 images, the most striking of which are collected here. This is a book of obsessions; both Campeau's own and that of the original piglet snapper, who worked for thirty five years on the project, producing thousands of shots (now mostly destroyed).Colour, 155 x 200 mm, 148 pages, soft cover.
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Eye Magazine 100 – Talking about Graphic Design

Eye Magazine 100 – Talking about Graphic Design

Eye Magazine 100 - Talking about Graphic Design

Eye Magazine 100 - Talking about Graphic Design | For this issue, eleven prominent designers have generously given up time to talk about graphic design – discussing work processes, clients and their opinions in general. These illustrated conversations are interleaved with thirteen snapshots of projects that range from books to digital processing, from calligraffiti to Hangul type design. Taken together, the contents were originally intended to sketch out an array of graphic design and visual culture at the moment this magazine reaches a milestone: 100 issues in almost three decades of continuous publication since its launch. History, however, had a surprise in store. Though the images and artefacts that fill this edition are contemporary, they represent a freeze-framed ‘now’ that has taken on new significance. From our socially distanced present, design events such as the digital DEMO festival, held in a busy metropolitan railway station, feel like transmissions from a parallel universe. Many such glimpses of pre-Covid-19 life can seem similarly unreal, while the post-Covid world is necessarily undefined. Yet we know that as every aspect of society and business changes to absorb the lessons of this pandemic, design will also have to evolve. Whatever happens, a return to ‘business as usual’ is unlikely (as environmentalists have argued for some time). Here in the pages of Eye 100 we present a panorama of current, time-stamped graphic design practice as we wait expectantly – screenbound – on the cusp of a new reality that may take years to grasp. Whatever happens within the future world of visual culture, we are certain to keep talking about graphic design. John L. Walters, editor of Eye, London
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Upstate Diary 10 – Nature Comes First

Upstate Diary 10 – Nature Comes First

Upstate Diary 10 - Nature Comes First

Upstate Diary 10 is featuring: Jerry Saltz, the Pulitzer Prize winning art critic, discusses his upcoming book How to Be an Artist. An amazing spread full of inspirational energy! Annie Leibovitz captures the former outpost of the Bloomsbury Group, in West Sussex, UK, where Virginia Wolf wrote Orlando. Award winning writer Mark Hooper gives us deeper insight into the writers and intellectuals who gathered there in the 20th century and how they pioneered the LBGT community — almost a century before those letters were recognized. Gregory Crewdson, the world-renowned artist and director has a daily swim routine that inspires the creation of his stunning work. Lets go for a swim! Peter Saul is frequently referred to as the founder of Pop Art. His upcoming retrospective in the Spring of 2020, at The New Museum (NYC), is highly anticipated. Photographer Marcelo Krasilcic checks out his place. Helen Molesworth, the renowned art curator, shares what inspired her to become a curator and her concept for an upcoming exhibition at Jack Shainman’s School gallery. Christian Witkin captured her portrait. Jeremy Anderson, co-founder of Apparatus Design, shows us his new line of ceramic vessels created at the studio on his country property. Carlton Davis documents it all. Elfie Semotan broke ground with her fashion images in the ‘90s. At her home in the Austrian countryside, she documents personal objects that have particular meaning to her. We feature the remarkable Plastic Tent House by architect John M. Johansen (1916–2012), a member of the Harvard Five. Don Freeman documented the space while Johnson was still alive and the photos have never been published, until now. Charlie McCormick, in an intimate visit to his spectacular gardens in Dorset, UK, shares his secrets on how to grow prize-winning Dahlias. How we love Dahlias! Documented by Julian Broad. Artist Portia Munson lives and works in a home unlike any other — it’s a fairy tale on acid! Morgan J. Puett, artist and former fashion designer, shows us how her daily life is all performance art. Guzman capture Puett in action. Her close friend and former Chief Editor of Out magazine, Aaron Hicklin, sums it all up. And more… Upstate Diary features amazing artists and creators with lifestyles close to nature. Come on inside, we look at country living in a whole new way! Dive in & be inspired! Biannual / 21x 28 cm / Perfect binding / 112 p / Off-set printing.
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Back Office – subscription

Back Office – subscription

Back Office

Back Office is a response to the fact that, despite the growing number of French publications and publishing houses devoted to graphic design, there is very little research being done directly on the effects of digital technology. While, in English, one finds numerous publications on established fields such as the history of computer science, the philosophy of digital technology, media archaeology, and software studies, this is not the case in French. The lack of French publications and critical distance about digital technology, which is such a major part of our lives now that the very designation “digital,” when applied to fields such as design and the social sciences, is almost superfluous, is the raison d’être of Back Office. Like its twin magazine, Back Cover (Editions B42), it is a bilingual annual journal that features a different theme each year. Back Office is published both in print and digitally. The journal features in-depth articles, along with shorter pieces on specific topics or innovative pedagogical initiatives, as well as a historical piece, excerpted and re-examined by its author after twenty years, looking back on the ways his discipline has evolved. A technical glossary will be in each issue to explain terms which are often confusing to the uninitiated. In light of the mass of mass media already available, Back Office is focused upon critical interpretation, providing perspectives, showcasing major issues, and proposing ideas to shed light on the current situation and blaze ever new trails.
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Flash Art 327

Flash Art 327

Flash Art 327 - Issue September/October 2019

Flash Art 327 | This issue of Flash Art, published during a crucial moment, looks toward the visual arts and the transitions the art world is currently undergoing, with the aim of giving voice to those who are often questioned by the very same systems of division and control. These last few months of global geopolitics and history have highlighted once again the delicate moment in which we are living. Over the past three years, almost four now, we have witnessed a global crisis due to an overabundance of information and a plurality of vision that, nonetheless, produces uncritical and “simplistic narrative,” (James Bridle, New Dark Age, 2018). Our lack of control over technology has contributed to the resurgence of nationalism, homophobia, and ethnic division — meanwhile the average temperature of Earth’s surface continues to rise and global biodiversity, instead, falls. Also featuring in Flash Art 327: Candice Breitz, Meriem Bennani, Marianna Simnett, Elysia Crampton, Too Old to Die Young and essays by Pierre Bal-Blanc and Monique Roelofs. A selection of excerpts from Intervista, Flash Art’s side publication on visual culture in the late 90’s.
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IdN Volume 25 | No 2 – Report, Brochure and Catalogue Design

IdN Volume 25 | No 2 – Report, Brochure and Catalogue Design

IdN Volume 25 | No 2: Report, Brochure and Catalogue Design — Dull Chore or Satisfyingly Challenging Act?

IdN Volume 25 | No 2: The ideal layout scenario for any graphic designer is virtual equivalence between the amount of space taken up by text and images. There is one area, however, in which such a goal is almost bound to be unachievable – that of designing reports, brochures and catalogues. Annual reports are by definition data-driven, while brochures and catalogues invariably involve a greater proportion of graphics to text. The point of them is to be attracted by the illustrations, which have to speak louder than words. On the other hand, much of the data needed for reports can be visually presented by way of tables, charts and other infographics, thus lessening the strain of ploughing through hundreds of words. There is a catch, though: given that annual reports are intended to give shareholders and other interested parties such as journalists and regulators information about the company’s activities and financial performance, it is essential that this information should be 100 percent accurate.
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