Magazines & books

Lodestars Special – England Issue

Lodestars Special – England Issue

Lodestars Special – England Issue

Lodestars Special - England Issue

Lodestars Special | England ... it is sylvan, unpredictable, sublime, originative and contradictory - a land of eccentricity and ingenuity, a mix of worlds, practices and lifestyles all enriched and enlivened by an enthrallingly complex past. Travel here and discover more than you thought possible - and that defining Englishness is a daunting task indeed. Lodestars Special - The England Issue is a magazine about forests, crags and drystone walls; about culinary daring, crumbling ruins and journeys into the wild. It is an ode to literary histories and a smuggling past, coastal towns and cultural capitals. Recalling long forgotten giants and lingering lore, this is our homage to England and the verve that makes it eternal. You can order the England Issue at Bruil & van de Staaij as a Single Product. This issue is not included with a Subscription to Lodestars Anthology.
Lodestar: A star used to guide seafaring travellers, most typically Polaris, the North Star. Something that acts as a model or inspiration.
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Still Lifes, Tokyo

Still Lifes, Tokyo

Still Lifes, Tokyo - by Rudy VanderLans

Still Lifes, Tokyo | Comprising more than two hundred photos taken over the course of three weeks, the third book in the Still Lifes series leaves the United States for the busy streets of Tokyo, resulting in a volume that is both of a piece with and dramatically different from Still Lifes: California and Still Lifes: USA. The roughly translated advertising blurb for the Tokyo hotel where Rudy VanderLans booked his stay promised “a world of stillness and motion,” and VanderLans used this as his creative prompt. Over the course of his stay, VanderLans walked over a hundred miles, camera in hand, capturing an extensive document of Tokyo’s lived-in details. Just as much care has been taken in the arrangement of the photos, with adjacent images often mirroring one another despite their wildly different subjects. Conspicuously devoid of human figures for such a populous city, these photos capture a Tokyo beneath the surface of the crowd, presenting a version of the city rarely seen in media of any kind.
Rudy VanderLans
Rudy VanderLans (born 1955, Voor­burg) is a Dutch type and graphic designer and the co-founder of Emigre, an in­de­pend­ent type foundry. VanderLans studied at the Royal Acade­my of Art in the Hague. Later, he moved to California and studied photog­raphy at the Uni­versity of California, Berkeley. In 1984, VanderLans, with his wife Zuzana Licko, founded Emigre and began to publish Emigre magazine a journal for experimental graphic design. Format: Hardcover Size: 183 mm x 131 mm Pages: 256 ISBN: 978-1-58423-7174
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Icon 179 – Milan and the Man

Icon 179 – Milan and the Man

Icon 179 – Milan and the Man

Icon 179 - Milan and the Man: How the Expo persuaded the design capital do sell out. Plus: 25 years of Droog, Claudio Luti, Forensic Architecture and more Twenty-five years ago, a group of Dutch designers arrived in Milan with a radical ‘anti-luxury, anti-formal and anti-product’ agenda. At the time, the Memphis movement – an offshoot of post-modernist architectural thinking – was, after a period of dominance in the 1980s, on the wane. Its legacy was opulence and self-indulgence – design for the few, not the many. In an Oedipal reaction to the status quo, the Dutch invasion, under the moniker Droog, which translates literally as ‘Dry’, was a purifying force that rejected commercialism and the mass market. As our story this month suggests, the movement could be seen through the prism of hair-shirted Calvinism, but the reality was Droog was anything but. The ideas put forward were witty subversions of long established typologies often imbued with a provocatively low-tech aesthetic. The few photos from the show – bleached out and unstaged – are about a million miles from homogeneity of Instagram-style art direction. In short, it was fun. Of course, as soon as the money started rolling in Droog as originally intended was all but dead. And in a strange irony, the it has perpetuated, and even ramped up, the rarified world of design art. Nevertheless, Droog was not a flash in the pan in the Memphis was. While its garish forerunner occasionally flares up now and again, a fire stoked by nostalgia rather then any genuine desire to revive pomo’s primary colours, Droog’s influence is more pervasive. Take a look at Studio Truly, Truly’s deconstructed sofa for Ikea, formed from an assemblage of individual cushions, or Dean Brown’s contribution to the Matter of Colour exhibition that saw the designer suspend vials of colour pigments from undecorated vases. Or any number of graduate shows where the students are producing pieces that place process and materials above pure functionality. When we look back at Droog, it is important to remember that it hailed from a time when the Salone was really just about furniture. Design as a discipline has proliferated and it is technology, not furniture design, which wields greater power over our lives. Droog captures a lost moment when it was still possible to make a statement and have everyone listen.
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Slanted 31 – Tokyo

Slanted 31 – Tokyo

Slanted 31 - Tokyo

Slanted 31 - Tokyo: A year ago, the Slanted team dove into Tokyo—with their friends Renna Okubo and Ian Lynam preventing them from drowning—to take an intense look at the contrasting design scene. The Japanese capital is a unique place. With its clean streets, punctual transportation and polite service at every turn, Tokyo is more than just a well-run city. It unites cultural extremes: it is a city where the futuristic meets the traditional and tranquility meets speed.

With the valuable help of Renna and Ian Slanted met some of the most amazing creatives such as &Form, Shin Akiyama, Tatsuya Ariyama, Dainippon Type Organization, Terada Hideji, Hitomi Sago Design Office, Ian Lynam Design, IDEA, KIGI, MATZDA OFFICE / USIWAKAMARU, Nakagaki Design Office, OMOMMA, PULP, Yoshihisa Shirai, TSDO, Yosuke Yamaguchi and woolen. Illustrations, interviews, and essays complement the issue thematically. Slanted 31 comes with contributions by AQ, Bunny Bissoux, DAIKANYAMA TSUTAYA BOOKS, Digiki, direction Q, Jesse Freeman, Sara Gally, heiQuiti Harata, Adrian Hogan, Yuki Kameguchi, Kamimura & Co., Toshiaki Koga, Dermot Mac Cormack, Akinobu Maeda, Gui Martinez, Luis Mendo, MISAKO & ROSEN, Eiko Nagase, Nakano Design Office, Naoko Nakui, Nanook, Taro Nettleton, Toshi Omagari, Louise Rouse, Michael Scaringe, Yoshihisa Shirai, Shotype Design, snöw, so+ba, Kohei Sugiura, Sumner Stone, Fumio Tachibana, Tetsunori Tawaraya, Patrick Tsai, Typecache, Dan Vaughan, Village, Makoto Yamaki, YamanoteYamanote, Ueda Yo, and Jody Zhou.
The Booklet
The booklet “Contemporary Typefaces” is a regular feature of Slanted Magazine presenting an editorial selection of recently published international high-quality typefaces, including FF Attribute (Viktor Nübel / FontFont by Monotype), Berlingske Serif Display (Jonas Hecksher / Playtype), BC Brief (Matyáš Machat / Briefcase Type Foundry), Bruta (Natanael Gama / NDISCOVER), Estampa Script (Sofia Mohr / Latinotype), Fenomen Slab (Rostislav Van?k, Tomáš Nedoma/ Signature Type Foundry), Haggard Nova (Ramiz Guseynov / TipografiaRamis), LFT Iro Sans (Leftloft / TypeTogether), Minérale (Thomas Huot-Marchand / 205TF), Pressio (Max Phillips / Signal Type Foundry), Saol Display (Florian Schick, Lauri Toikka / Schick Toikka), Scrittore (Pedro Leal, Dino dos Santos/ DSType), Solide Mirage (Jérémy Landes, Walid Bouchouchi / Velvetyne Type Foundry), Vesterbro (Jérémie Hornus, Ilya Naumoff, Alisa Nowak / Black[Foundry]). In an additional section the booklet features Japanese typefaces, including A1 Gothic (Morisawa Inc.), Mighty Slab (Ryoichi Tsunekawa / Dharma Type), Minna no Moji Mincho (Naoyuki Takeshita / Iwata), TP Sky (Isao Suzuki / Type Project), Tazugane Gothic (Akira Kobayashi,Kazuhiro Yamada, Ryota Doi/ Monotype), Ten Mincho (Ryoko Nishizuka / Adobe Originals) and Tsukushi Q Mincho (Shigenobu Fujita / Fontworks Inc.). Volume: 256 pages + 48-pages booklet Format: 16 × 24 cm
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THE PLANT, EDITORIAL IKEBANA

THE PLANT, EDITORIAL IKEBANA

[caption id="attachment_35715" align="alignnone" width="510"]THE PLANT, curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery, the magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers and visual artists. Cover of THE PLANT magazine for lovers of nature[/caption] The new issue of THE PLANT comes with a new design. It is the first issue that is not dedicated to a single plant, the magazine now is an ode to all nature, plants and gardening, a celebration of earth. It has a new masthead and a new design, a new format, a new section and of course new stories. As a curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery, the magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers and visual artists; both established and emerging, from all over the world, to share with The Plant their perceptions and experiences around plants. [caption id="attachment_35717" align="alignnone" width="600"]THE PLANT, a curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery, the magazine brings together photographers, illustrators, designers, musicians, writers and visual artists. Northern California in black and white[/caption] The new issue opens with California in pure black and white. Northern California, to be precise: 14 photographs by Brigitte Lacombe, French photographer living in New York, depicting a quiet countryside. Trees, meadows, hills and a few people. And the ocean of course, always the ocean. No subtitles, not a word on Brigitte, either you know her or you don't. It is just what it is: pure photography. No further distraction. [caption id="attachment_35718" align="alignnone" width="600"]The Bouroullec Brothers in The Plant The Bouroullec Brothers in THE PLANT[/caption] After that a series of articles and interviews. Claire Touzard meets the Bouroullec Brothers in Paris: "The Bourellec brothers are utopians in the disguise of prolific designers. All they do is create vases, desks, textiles and spaces. They imagine architectural structures and cities, and the more they create and imagine, the more their mental universe flourishes. They present us with a better way of life". Then, from Japan: Mistletoe in Kyoto: "... an unconspicious plant until winter arrives. Few people take an interest in it, and many evidentily mistake mistletoe shrubs for bird's nests". But The Plant does, and illustrates it with a series of photo's. There is a lot more of Japan in this renewed magazine that has so many fans worldwide. An article on Sofu Teshigahara, The Man Who Turned Flowers into Contemporary Art, founder of the Sogetsu School of Ikebana, the art of arranging flowers to idealise and stylise nature whilst reflecting the mind of the artist that created the work. [caption id="attachment_35723" align="alignnone" width="600"]A lot of Japan in the new The Plant Magazine A lot of Japan in the new THE PLANT[/caption] And the Flowers of Nobuyoshi Araki, also on the colour cover of this issue, world famous photographer, known for his explicit kinbaku photography, his preoccupation with lust and death. It is just that what his Flowers convey: that nature in spring is full of lust and botanical sexual energy. The photo series of Scheltens & Abbenes, Balancing Water, compensates Araki's intenseness. Its subject: the watering can, which is, as The Plant explains, invented in 1886 in London, by John Haws. Scheltens & Abbenes share 9 cans, stylishly and wet, photographed in technical perfection. Brand, volume and characteristics are mentioned: 'Strata, UK. 7 litre. The boxy space-saving design from Nottinghamshire, England. Incredibly practical and comfortable-to-use dual handle shape..." [caption id="attachment_35722" align="alignnone" width="600"]Balancing Water, a series of photographs by Scheltens & Abbenes. Balancing Water, a series of photographs by Scheltens & Abbenes[/caption] And there is more in the nearly 180 pages of this new and entirely renewned issue: Marcelo Gomes' photography of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, picturing the openness of these uncrowded states. The Loose Leaves section, with one-pagers on gardening, plants, garden tools, with curious titles as The Avant-Gardener and Gods of Jumblingness. A beautifully illustrated article on nephology, the study of clouds, an interview with Jeremy Deller, the artist who worked a decade on his garden artwork Speak To Earth. A visit to the gardens of French Chateau de Villandry, the production of rose water in Iran. A camouflaged fashion shoot, photgraphed by Sam Rock. Many articles, many angles, all with that freshness of early spring. [caption id="attachment_35721" align="alignnone" width="600"]THE PLANT, A work of editorial ikebana, we would call it. THE PLANT, A work of editorial ikebana, we would call it.[/caption] Reading THE PLANT is a truely botanical experience not only because of the articles, the whole magazine is like a garden full of beautiful flowers, that makes you look closer, contemplate and enjoy beauty. A work of editorial ikebana, we would call it: "characteristics of ikebana can be defined in terms of lines and mass, colour, composition, space, volume, strength and delacacy". Those are exactly the qualities that this inspirational magazine combines. THE PLANT 12 - SPRING/SUMMER 2018 THE PLANT SUBSCRIPTION STILL AVAILABLE The Plant 11 – Aloe Vera The Plant 10 – Elephant Ear / 2 covers The Plant 9 – Geranium (is back)
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The Plant 12 – Cover 2

The Plant 12 – Cover 2

The Plant 12 - The Appearance will become the Reality

The Plant 12 is here! This NEW issue comes with NEW design, NEW format and NEW stories. The magazine features a new flower series by Nobuyoshi Araki, a trip to California by Brigitte Lacombe, Mistletoe, Takashi Homma, Erwan & Ronan Bouroullec, Jeremy Deller and Rose Water in Iran. Sam Rock and Maarten van der Horst on a Camouflage story. Château de Villandry, Sogetsu Ikebana School, Balancing Water by Scheltens & Abbenes, The Ocean Above and Idaho Montana Wyoming by Marcelo Gomes. Plus: the new section Loose Leaves with the most interesting stories by Matthew Wright, Barnabé Fillion and Daisy Hoppen among others on Fans, Willy Guhl, an Avant-Gardener and Euphorbia of East Africa.
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The Plant 12 – Cover 1

The Plant 12 – Cover 1

The Plant 12 - The Appearance will become the Reality

The Plant 12 is here! This NEW issue comes with NEW design, NEW format and NEW stories. The magazine features a new flower series by Nobuyoshi Araki, a trip to California by Brigitte Lacombe, Mistletoe, Takashi Homma, Erwan & Ronan Bouroullec, Jeremy Deller and Rose Water in Iran. Sam Rock and Maarten van der Horst on a Camouflage story. Château de Villandry, Sogetsu Ikebana School, Balancing Water by Scheltens & Abbenes, The Ocean Above and Idaho Montana Wyoming by Marcelo Gomes. Plus: the new section Loose Leaves with the most interesting stories by Matthew Wright, Barnabé Fillion and Daisy Hoppen among others on Fans, Willy Guhl, an Avant-Gardener and Euphorbia of East Africa.
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Still Lifes, U.S.A.

Still Lifes, U.S.A.

Still Lifes, U.S.A. - by Rudy VanderLans

Still Lifes, U.S.A. - Upon his arrival in the US some 36 years ago, Rudy VanderLans embarked on a pan-American bus trip from New York to California. Overwhelmed by the experience, he rarely took out his camera, feeling unprepared for the challenge to do justice to the visual overload of the American environment. In 2016 he set out to retrace his route, this time with camera in hand and a determination to record the experience. If the work seems familiar at times, VanderLans is quick to name his influences: “It’s through the photographs of Ruscha, Shore, Friedlander, Eggleston, and others that I learned to look at America more discerningly,” he says. “I use their examples as a jumping off point to distill my own impressions.” The haunting work that resulted from his journey, published exclusively in book form, creates the second entry in a trilogy of books that began with Still Lifes, California. These postcards from the road evoke both tranquility and solitude, entropy and loneliness in equal measures.
Rudy VanderLans
Rudy VanderLans (born 1955, Voor­burg) is a Dutch type and graphic designer and the co-founder of Emigre, an in­de­pend­ent type foundry. VanderLans studied at the Royal Acade­my of Art in the Hague. Later, he moved to California and studied photog­raphy at the Uni­versity of California, Berkeley. In 1984, VanderLans, with his wife Zuzana Licko, founded Emigre and began to publish Emigre magazine a journal for experimental graphic design. Format: Hardcover Size: 7? x 5? Pages: 120 ISBN: 978-1-58423-653-5
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Slanted 30 – Athens

Slanted 30 – Athens

Slanted 30 - Athens

Slanted 30 - Athens. In the spring of 2017 the Slanted editors embarked on their trip to Athens to take a close-up look at the contemporary design scene there. At the same time, the Documenta took place for the first time at two sites with the same credentials as the core of Adam Szymczyk's concept. He wanted to show art against the background of other commercial urgencies. Athens, in parallel to Kassel, offered the perfect canvas: differences between rich and poor, between Germany and Greece, but also between different cultures in Europe, facing crisis, boundaries and displacement. All the designers Slanted met though talked very positively about the event, bringing back art and life to Athens, suffering from draconian cuts in culture budgets.

The list of designers Slanted met with boasts everyone from legends such as Michalis Katzourakis to young, wild creatives who are creating exciting voices in their own right. Well known figures from Athen’s contemporary design scene such as Bend, The Birthdays Design, Blaqk, Bob Studio, Dylsectic, G Design Studio, Irini Gonou, Luminous Design Group, MAMA Silkscreen, MNP, Parachute, StudioJugi, Typical Organization, Urban Calligraphy and Ifigenia Vasiliou allowed a glimpse into their world. Illustrations, photography, interviews and essays complement the issue thematically. Slanted 30 comes with contributions by Backpacker, Beetroot Design Group, Constantinos Chaidalis, Meni Chatzipanagiotou, Corn Studio, Stavros Damos, Dolphins Com­mu­nication Design,, Demetrios Fakinos, Diana Farr Louis, Fotagogos Book­store, Greek Font Society, Vasilis Grivas, Mike Karolos, Kommigraphics Design Studio, Ian Lynam, Theodora Mantzaris, Klimis Mastoridis, Georgios Matthiopoulos, mousegraphics, Original Replica, Panos Papanagiotou, Dimitris Papazoglou, Natassa Pappa, Pi6, Polkadot Design, Semiotik, Niki Sioki, tind, Alexander Torrell, Filimonas Triantafyllou, Chris Trivizas, Charis Tsevis, Nadia Valavani, Irene Vlachou and Markos Zouridakis. The booklet “Contemporary Typefaces” is a regular feature of Slanted Magazine presenting an editorial selection of recently published international high-quality typefaces. In an additional section the booklet features Greek typefaces, including Ace Lift?(Romain Oudin /?Lift Type), Aidos?(Alexander Rütten /?Ligature Inc.), Baton Turbo (Anton Koovit, Yassin Baggar?/?Fatype), bb-book (Benoît Bodhuin?/ VolcanoType), CamingoSlab Pro (Jan Fromm?/?Jan Fromm), Chercán (Francisco Gálvez Pizarro?/ PampaType), Fit (David Jonathan Ross?/?DJR), Freya (Markus John, Armin Brenner?/?NEW LETTERS), Hobeaux Rococeaux (James Edmondson?/?OH no Type Co.), Lisbeth (Louisa Fröhlich?/?TypeTogether), Morion (David Einwaller?/?The Designers Foundry), 29LT Riwaya (Katharina Seidl?/?29Letters), Sharp Grotesk (Lucas Sharp with Wei Huang, Greg Gazdowicz, Chantra Malee, Octavia Pardo?/?Sharp Type), Thesaurus?(Fermín Guerrero/?Typotheque), CF Astir (Yannis Karlopoulos, Vassilis Georgiou, Panos Haratzpoulos?/?fonts.gr), Averta PE (Kostas Bartsokas?/?Kostas Bartsokas), Futuracha Pro (høly?/?høly), Juvenile?(Anastasia Dimitriadi /?Anastasia Dimitriadi), Scope One (Eleni Beveratou?/?Dalton Maag), PF Venue (Panos Vassiliou?/?Parachute) and Vs. (George Triantafyllakos?/?Atypical). Volume: 256 pages + 48-pages booklet Format: 16 × 24 cm
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Volume 51 – Augmented Technology

Volume 51 – Augmented Technology

Volume 51 - Augmented Technology

Volume 51 - Augmented Technology | As recent technological advancement became more and more pervasive and sophisticated, its consequences became more dramatically evident. In this context, design takes on a new relevance, in organizing and managing spaces, individuals, relations and ultimately societies. But if this is clear, several questions have to be answered: Who is driving it, who are the participants, who are sitting around the table? Does spatial design currently have a say in this, and if not, how can it participate and intervene? With contributions by Sigrid Johannisse, Charles Landry, Clement Valla, Florence Okoye, Tamar Shafrir, Felix Madrazo, Adrien Ravon, Ben Schouten, Martijn de Waal, Adam van Heerden, Nick Land, Fred F. J. Schoorl, Doma, Victor M. Sanz, Sever, Leonardo Dellanoce, Liam Young, Nicolay Boyadjiev, Benjamin Bratton, Keiichi Matsuda, Stephan Petermann and Sander Pleij. Volume 51 - Augmented Technology includes Deconstruction, a 32-page insert produced with the Jacob Bakema Study Centre and designed by Loraine Furter. It investigates the deconstruction and reuse of modernist building components as researched by Rotor. Information Volume 51 – Augmented Technology: editor-in-chief Arjen Oosterman, designed by Irma Boom Office (I. Boom, T. Heijboer, Jan van der Kleijn, E. van Bemmelen), 104 Pages, 33 x 24 cm Soft cover, stapled ISSN 1574-9401 ISBN 9789077966617.
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INTIMATE MAGAZINES FROM MILAN

INTIMATE MAGAZINES FROM MILAN

Two creative magazines from Milan present their latest issues. ALLA CARTA, the magazine on high-end fashion, art and design, explores lush lust and carnal affinities in the LA GRANDE ABBUFFATA ISSUE. With 'multo divertente photography', by Francesco Nazardo, Jonathan Frantini, Pasquale Bove, and Yara de Nicola. Sensuality from Milano. Alla Carta is a bi-annual international publication that approaches high-end fashion, art and design in a unique Italian way. The LA GRANDE ABBUFFATA ISSUE (abbuffata means binge) tells of relationships that hang in a delicate balance and of pure carnal affinities. An ostentatious orgy of vice, ritual and obsession with grotesque images of an Italy frozen in time. The physical and symbolic density of food and the body. Desire and transgression. It festively features lunch with OAMC and Jil Sander creative director Luke Meier, a dinner with designer Damir Doma and a conversation with architect Nanda Vigo, plus Spring Summer 2017 collections and much more. Alla Carta is a bi-annual international publication that approaches high-end fashion, art and design in a unique Italian way. The result is pure lust for the eye, with an intimate Italian twist. You must be very enthousiastic by now, but we have to dampen this a bit. This Big Binge issue is completely sold out, but there is an escape. Older issues of ALLA CARTA are still available and a subscription solves the problem for at least a year, that is, for future issues. ALLA CARTA is published twice a year. CollectibleDry magazine wants to be a platform of unendorsed points of view; a place where meaning prevails over an overload of the repeatable. Also from Milan: COLLECTIBLE DRY, somewhat on the same track, researching the nature of love for a new generation. According to the LOVE ACTUALLY ISSUE of the magazine that publishes its third issue, there is a new desire to be people and at the same time a tendency toward a truer intimacy, one free of fashions, trends and restrictions. Thus the 'pansexual, genderfuck generation' was born, whose members reject the binary categories of gender: neither male nor female. "But in the end, does it still make sense to talk of love?", says the editor, "Enough with sacrifice, we want the impossible! We want a loving world, one that leaves us be and lets us be ourselves. Not easy, right? Make love, not war." This is how this translates into content: accumulations of objects, fetishes revealing secret passions; the innocent exhibition of a beauty that doesn’t fear nudity. In the LOVE ACTUALLY ISSUE: creative work of JEFF BARK, AI JING, ELEANOR LAMBERT, ANTONIO MARRAS, ROBERT INDIANA, DOROTHEA LANGE and STAZ LINDES (cover).
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Kinfolk 23 – The Spring Issue

Kinfolk 23 – The Spring Issue

Kinfolk 23: The Spring Issue

Kinfolk 23, The Spring Issue, examines the nuances of free time, its rituals and rhythms and its capacity to reinvigorate. Rather than advising how to fill 48 hours, the issue offers insight into why we should fill our weekends, and how doing so can lead to personal fulfillment. With a dynamic mix of long-form journalism, interviews and shorter essays, plus concept-driven visual stories and contributors across the globe, Kinfolk 23 continues to dedicate its editorial to exploring personal values and quality of life.

From the curious cultural mythologies behind sleep and fashion editorial for looking good on laundry day to interviews with Moses Sumney, Dimore Studio and more, this issue will inspire readers with a fresh outlook on going off-duty.

192 pages, offset-printed and perfect bound, full color on uncoated and coated paper. Printed in Canada.

On Kinfolk

Founded in 2011, Kinfolk - published in Copenhagen, Denmark - is now a leading independent lifestyle magazine for young creative professionals and also produces international editions in Japan, China, Korea and Russia. Published quarterly, Kinfolk maintains a vibrant contributor base from Copenhagen to Cape Town and hosts hundreds of global events that bring the community together.
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An Elephants Ear And A Humble Coconut

An Elephants Ear And A Humble Coconut

THE PLANT offers to plant lovers a new look on greenery by featuring green and blossoming works of creative people. In THE PLANT no. 10 there are roses by Nick Knight, an essay on flowers in Fassbinder’s films and tree barks by Shota Nakamura. Coke Bartrina shows you how to build your own solar food dryer and Matthew Wright brings his botanical wisdom to teach you about the humble coconut and the gift of bulbs. THE PLANT's botanical monograph is dedicated to the Elephant Ear plant. As an extra: a beautiful print by Dutch photographer Viviane Sassen. THE PLANT No. 10 - ELEPHANTS EAR >
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Harvard Design Magazine 39 – Wet Matter

Harvard Design Magazine 39 – Wet Matter

Harvard Design Magazine 39 - Wet Matter (Fall/Winter 2014)

The ocean remains a glaring blind spot in the Western imagination. Catastrophic events remind us of its influence—a lost airplane, a shark attack, an oil spill, an underwater earthquake—but we tend to marginalize or misunderstand the scales of the oceanic. It represents the “other 71 percent” of our planet. Meanwhile, like land, its surface and space continue to be radically instrumentalized: offshore zones territorialized by nation-states, high seas crisscrossed by shipping routes, estuaries metabolized by effluents, sea levels sensed by satellites, seabeds lined with submarines and plumbed for resources. As sewer, conveyor, battlefield, or mine, the ocean is a vast logistical landscape. Whether we speak of fishing zones or fish migration, coastal resilience or tropical storms, the ocean is both a frame for regulatory controls and a field of uncontrollable, indivisible processes. To characterize the ocean as catastrophic—imperiled environment, coastal risk, or contested territory—is to overlook its potential power. The environments and mythologies of the ocean continue to support contemporary urban life in ways unseen and unimagined. The oceanic project—like the work of Marie Tharp, who mapped the seafloor in the shadows of Cold War star scientists—challenges the dry, closed, terrestrial frameworks that shape today’s industrial, corporate, and economic patterns. As contemporary civilization takes the oceanic turn, its future clearly lies beyond the purview of any head of state or space of a nation. Reexamining the ocean’s historic and superficial remoteness, Harvard Design Magazine 39 profiles the ocean as contemporary urban space and subject of material, political, and ecologic significance, asking how we are shaping it, and how it is shaping us.
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Monu 6 – Beautiful Urbanism

Monu 6 – Beautiful Urbanism

Potentially Beautiful by Sean Burkholder; Beyond Kitsch by Dirk Hebel and Deane Simpson; Sterile Rotterdam by Melisa Vargas; The Anti-Urinator by Supersudaca; Beauty and the Sublime by Joost Meuwissen; The Revolving Transient by Lukas Reichel; Pedaling Hope by Jen Petersen; Microrayons by Bee Flowers; Advanced City Camouflage by Cruz Garcia; Stripped Bare by Nathalie Aguinaldo; The Terrifying Century of Beautiful Urbanism by Bert de Muynck; The Secrets behind the Making of a Beautiful City: Jakarta by Ilya Maharika; A short Encounter with a Chair by Katerina Pertselaki; Beautiful Urbanism by Pierre De Angelis; Great Unraveling by Ju-Hyun Kim and Bohyun Kim; The City Beautiful by Suzanne Loen; A Typology of Mess Punkt by Jeremy Beaudry; Big is Beautiful by Jarrik Ouburg Even though the concept beauty remains elusive we think our issue is successful in shining some spotlights on the issue. One of the themes from the articles is that beauty in urbanism is what one could call an emergent quality. It rarely is in the object itself. It exists in the way we perceive spaces and objects, our vantage point. It is while wandering though the city, resolving contradictions, when we see things that jolt our imaginations that we experience beauty. It can be a small detail such as obscure dots on the sidewalk that German civil engineers place all over the city to measure which propel Jeremy Beaudry along daydreaming trajectories as he assembles the dotted pattern of Berlin. Movement plays a central part, be it by bicycle as Jen Petersen describes or in future cable cars that Lukas Reichelt invents. Or within 30 years high resolution and real time aerial photography will open yet another facade of the city to our perception – the view of the roofs as Ju-Hyun Kim and Bohyun Kim predict. But if it is not all just in our minds then there are some important tools for those who do care about who and what it is that is built and declared beautiful – or left for us to find the beauty in. How much leverage do we really have to imagine or stamp that which is beautiful – if we must resolve ourselves between a complete rejection of the sorts of beauty that seems to have many followers – Disney architecture for example – to a naïve embracing of 30m high cowboy boots? Can we go truly Beyond Kitsch as Dirk Hebel and Diane Simpson suggest? Does the striving for a generic sense of beauty bear even more serious repercussions as Ilya Maharika argues in his study of Jakarta?
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Kaleidoscope 25 – Petra Cortright

Kaleidoscope 25 – Petra Cortright

We are pleased to announce KALEIDOSCOPE’s new release (Fall 2015), hitting the target of 25 issues! To celebrate this special occasion, we’ve put together an exquisite themed edition, one dedicated to all expressions of sexuality as addressed in contemporary art and visual culture. The Art&Sex Edition comes with a set of 4 collectable covers dedicated to iconic LA photographer Jeff Burton, uprising art star Petra Cortright, visceral New York painter Carroll Dunham (photographed by Roe Ethridge), and Norwegian provocateur Bjarne Melgaard (feat. Babak Radboy). A 150+ page survey takes over the magazine’s signature “Main Theme,” “Mono” and “Visions” sections, bringing together artists and creators from different generations and with different agendas, who share a fascination, concern and even obsession with the Great Theme of Sex. The MAIN THEME section is centered on two panel discussions moderated by Fiona Duncan, respectively dedicated to the hot topics of sense and virtuality (with pornstar Vex Ashley; scent archivist Sissel Tolaas; fiction publisher Badlands Unlimited; sex-ed instructors Ana Cecilia Alvarez and Victoria Campbell; and LA-based artist Petra Cortright) and gender fluidity & post-identity (with unisex fashion designer Telfar Clemens; trans magazine pro Amos Mac; ambi artist Andrea Crespo; androgyne A.L. Steiner; and hot chaos philosopher Harry Dodge). The discussions are punctuated by features on photographer Walter Pfeiffer, Taschen Sexy Books editor Dian Hanson, filmmaker Gaspar Noé, and music duo The Internet. For three decades New York-based painter Carroll Dunham—to whom this issue’s MONO section is dedicated—has serially tackled the trope of nudity with a subjective, universal, quasi-feminist approach. This definitive monographic survey features an essay by Catherine Taft, an interview by Judith Bernstein, and specially-commissioned portraits by Roe Ethridge. Later on, the VISIONS section invites the eye to an enthralling journey across visual contributions by artists, curators and image-makers, including Jeff BurtonRafael de CárdenasCharlie WhiteApollonia SaintclairCelia HemptonBjarne Melgaard feat. Babak RadboyMathew Cerletty, and Mike Bouchet. The opening section of “Highlights” and the closing section of “Regulars,” independent from the themed survey, complete the issue with a rich and varied selection of the best of the busy fall season and insightful contributions from our columnists and correspondents around the globe. HIGHLIGHTS features profiles on Calvin Marcus (by Samantha Gregg), GCC (by Myriam Ben Salah), Rachel Rose (by George Vasey), Matteo Callegari (by Clément Delépine), Aki Sasamoto (by Mathieu Copeland), Katherine Bernhardt (by Christopher Schreck), Jared Madere (by Alexander Shulan), Olivier Mosset (by Gianni Jetzer), Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz (by Binghao Wong), Daiga Grantina (by Martha Kirszenbaum), Queer Thoughts (by Forrest Nash), and Steven Claydon (by Martin Clark). In the REGULARS section, “Producers” features Carson Chan in conversation with M+ curator Aric ChenSidd Perez unveils Manila’s art scene as part of the “Panorama” series; in “Futura 89+,” Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets (with Katherine Dionysius) interview young South African artist Bogosi Sekhukhuni; in “Pioneers,” Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen talk to William LeavittJeffrey Deitch advocates for Free Photography in his “Renaissance Man” column; and William Zhao delves into the “Ecosystem” of Asian art scenes by talking to art patron Adrian Cheng.
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Kaleidoscope 25 – Carroll Dunham

Kaleidoscope 25 – Carroll Dunham

We are pleased to announce KALEIDOSCOPE’s new release (Fall 2015), hitting the target of 25 issues! To celebrate this special occasion, we’ve put together an exquisite themed edition, one dedicated to all expressions of sexuality as addressed in contemporary art and visual culture. The Art&Sex Edition comes with a set of 4 collectable covers dedicated to iconic LA photographer Jeff Burton, uprising art star Petra Cortright, visceral New York painter Carroll Dunham (photographed by Roe Ethridge), and Norwegian provocateur Bjarne Melgaard (feat. Babak Radboy). A 150+ page survey takes over the magazine’s signature “Main Theme,” “Mono” and “Visions” sections, bringing together artists and creators from different generations and with different agendas, who share a fascination, concern and even obsession with the Great Theme of Sex. The MAIN THEME section is centered on two panel discussions moderated by Fiona Duncan, respectively dedicated to the hot topics of sense and virtuality (with pornstar Vex Ashley; scent archivist Sissel Tolaas; fiction publisher Badlands Unlimited; sex-ed instructors Ana Cecilia Alvarez and Victoria Campbell; and LA-based artist Petra Cortright) and gender fluidity & post-identity (with unisex fashion designer Telfar Clemens; trans magazine pro Amos Mac; ambi artist Andrea Crespo; androgyne A.L. Steiner; and hot chaos philosopher Harry Dodge). The discussions are punctuated by features on photographer Walter Pfeiffer, Taschen Sexy Books editor Dian Hanson, filmmaker Gaspar Noé, and music duo The Internet. For three decades New York-based painter Carroll Dunham—to whom this issue’s MONO section is dedicated—has serially tackled the trope of nudity with a subjective, universal, quasi-feminist approach. This definitive monographic survey features an essay by Catherine Taft, an interview by Judith Bernstein, and specially-commissioned portraits by Roe Ethridge. Later on, the VISIONS section invites the eye to an enthralling journey across visual contributions by artists, curators and image-makers, including Jeff BurtonRafael de CárdenasCharlie WhiteApollonia SaintclairCelia HemptonBjarne Melgaard feat. Babak RadboyMathew Cerletty, and Mike Bouchet. The opening section of “Highlights” and the closing section of “Regulars,” independent from the themed survey, complete the issue with a rich and varied selection of the best of the busy fall season and insightful contributions from our columnists and correspondents around the globe. HIGHLIGHTS features profiles on Calvin Marcus (by Samantha Gregg), GCC (by Myriam Ben Salah), Rachel Rose (by George Vasey), Matteo Callegari (by Clément Delépine), Aki Sasamoto (by Mathieu Copeland), Katherine Bernhardt (by Christopher Schreck), Jared Madere (by Alexander Shulan), Olivier Mosset (by Gianni Jetzer), Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz (by Binghao Wong), Daiga Grantina (by Martha Kirszenbaum), Queer Thoughts (by Forrest Nash), and Steven Claydon (by Martin Clark). In the REGULARS section, “Producers” features Carson Chan in conversation with M+ curator Aric ChenSidd Perez unveils Manila’s art scene as part of the “Panorama” series; in “Futura 89+,” Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets (with Katherine Dionysius) interview young South African artist Bogosi Sekhukhuni; in “Pioneers,” Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen talk to William LeavittJeffrey Deitch advocates for Free Photography in his “Renaissance Man” column; and William Zhao delves into the “Ecosystem” of Asian art scenes by talking to art patron Adrian Cheng.
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Kaleidoscope 25 – Jeff Burton

Kaleidoscope 25 – Jeff Burton

We are pleased to announce KALEIDOSCOPE’s new release (Fall 2015), hitting the target of 25 issues! To celebrate this special occasion, we’ve put together an exquisite themed edition, one dedicated to all expressions of sexuality as addressed in contemporary art and visual culture. The Art&Sex Edition comes with a set of 4 collectable covers dedicated to iconic LA photographer Jeff Burton, uprising art star Petra Cortright, visceral New York painter Carroll Dunham (photographed by Roe Ethridge), and Norwegian provocateur Bjarne Melgaard (feat. Babak Radboy). A 150+ page survey takes over the magazine’s signature “Main Theme,” “Mono” and “Visions” sections, bringing together artists and creators from different generations and with different agendas, who share a fascination, concern and even obsession with the Great Theme of Sex. The MAIN THEME section is centered on two panel discussions moderated by Fiona Duncan, respectively dedicated to the hot topics of sense and virtuality (with pornstar Vex Ashley; scent archivist Sissel Tolaas; fiction publisher Badlands Unlimited; sex-ed instructors Ana Cecilia Alvarez and Victoria Campbell; and LA-based artist Petra Cortright) and gender fluidity & post-identity (with unisex fashion designer Telfar Clemens; trans magazine pro Amos Mac; ambi artist Andrea Crespo; androgyne A.L. Steiner; and hot chaos philosopher Harry Dodge). The discussions are punctuated by features on photographer Walter Pfeiffer, Taschen Sexy Books editor Dian Hanson, filmmaker Gaspar Noé, and music duo The Internet. For three decades New York-based painter Carroll Dunham—to whom this issue’s MONO section is dedicated—has serially tackled the trope of nudity with a subjective, universal, quasi-feminist approach. This definitive monographic survey features an essay by Catherine Taft, an interview by Judith Bernstein, and specially-commissioned portraits by Roe Ethridge. Later on, the VISIONS section invites the eye to an enthralling journey across visual contributions by artists, curators and image-makers, including Jeff BurtonRafael de CárdenasCharlie WhiteApollonia SaintclairCelia HemptonBjarne Melgaard feat. Babak RadboyMathew Cerletty, and Mike Bouchet. The opening section of “Highlights” and the closing section of “Regulars,” independent from the themed survey, complete the issue with a rich and varied selection of the best of the busy fall season and insightful contributions from our columnists and correspondents around the globe. HIGHLIGHTS features profiles on Calvin Marcus (by Samantha Gregg), GCC (by Myriam Ben Salah), Rachel Rose (by George Vasey), Matteo Callegari (by Clément Delépine), Aki Sasamoto (by Mathieu Copeland), Katherine Bernhardt (by Christopher Schreck), Jared Madere (by Alexander Shulan), Olivier Mosset (by Gianni Jetzer), Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz (by Binghao Wong), Daiga Grantina (by Martha Kirszenbaum), Queer Thoughts (by Forrest Nash), and Steven Claydon (by Martin Clark). In the REGULARS section, “Producers” features Carson Chan in conversation with M+ curator Aric ChenSidd Perez unveils Manila’s art scene as part of the “Panorama” series; in “Futura 89+,” Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets (with Katherine Dionysius) interview young South African artist Bogosi Sekhukhuni; in “Pioneers,” Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen talk to William LeavittJeffrey Deitch advocates for Free Photography in his “Renaissance Man” column; and William Zhao delves into the “Ecosystem” of Asian art scenes by talking to art patron Adrian Cheng.
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Kaleidoscope 25 – Bjarne Melgaard

Kaleidoscope 25 – Bjarne Melgaard

We are pleased to announce KALEIDOSCOPE’s new release (Fall 2015), hitting the target of 25 issues! To celebrate this special occasion, we've put together an exquisite themed edition, one dedicated to all expressions of sexuality as addressed in contemporary art and visual culture. The Art&Sex Edition comes with a set of 4 collectable covers dedicated to iconic LA photographer Jeff Burton, uprising art star Petra Cortright, visceral New York painter Carroll Dunham (photographed by Roe Ethridge), and Norwegian provocateur Bjarne Melgaard (feat. Babak Radboy). A 150+ page survey takes over the magazine’s signature “Main Theme,” “Mono” and “Visions” sections, bringing together artists and creators from different generations and with different agendas, who share a fascination, concern and even obsession with the Great Theme of Sex. The MAIN THEME section is centered on two panel discussions moderated by Fiona Duncan, respectively dedicated to the hot topics of sense and virtuality (with pornstar Vex Ashley; scent archivist Sissel Tolaas; fiction publisher Badlands Unlimited; sex-ed instructors Ana Cecilia Alvarez and Victoria Campbell; and LA-based artist Petra Cortright) and gender fluidity & post-identity (with unisex fashion designer Telfar Clemens; trans magazine pro Amos Mac; ambi artist Andrea Crespo; androgyne A.L. Steiner; and hot chaos philosopher Harry Dodge). The discussions are punctuated by features on photographer Walter Pfeiffer, Taschen Sexy Books editor Dian Hanson, filmmaker Gaspar Noé, and music duo The Internet. For three decades New York-based painter Carroll Dunham—to whom this issue’s MONO section is dedicated—has serially tackled the trope of nudity with a subjective, universal, quasi-feminist approach. This definitive monographic survey features an essay by Catherine Taft, an interview by Judith Bernstein, and specially-commissioned portraits by Roe Ethridge. Later on, the VISIONS section invites the eye to an enthralling journey across visual contributions by artists, curators and image-makers, including Jeff BurtonRafael de CárdenasCharlie WhiteApollonia SaintclairCelia HemptonBjarne Melgaard feat. Babak RadboyMathew Cerletty, and Mike Bouchet. The opening section of “Highlights” and the closing section of “Regulars,” independent from the themed survey, complete the issue with a rich and varied selection of the best of the busy fall season and insightful contributions from our columnists and correspondents around the globe. HIGHLIGHTS features profiles on Calvin Marcus (by Samantha Gregg), GCC (by Myriam Ben Salah), Rachel Rose (by George Vasey), Matteo Callegari (by Clément Delépine), Aki Sasamoto (by Mathieu Copeland), Katherine Bernhardt (by Christopher Schreck), Jared Madere (by Alexander Shulan), Olivier Mosset (by Gianni Jetzer), Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz (by Binghao Wong), Daiga Grantina (by Martha Kirszenbaum), Queer Thoughts (by Forrest Nash), and Steven Claydon (by Martin Clark). In the REGULARS section, “Producers” features Carson Chan in conversation with M+ curator Aric ChenSidd Perez unveils Manila’s art scene as part of the “Panorama” series; in “Futura 89+,” Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets (with Katherine Dionysius) interview young South African artist Bogosi Sekhukhuni; in “Pioneers,” Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen talk to William LeavittJeffrey Deitch advocates for Free Photography in his “Renaissance Man” column; and William Zhao delves into the “Ecosystem” of Asian art scenes by talking to art patron Adrian Cheng.  
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Yvi Magazine 7

Yvi Magazine 7

Confrontation! It exposes, it is usually violent and it brings everything up sharp. Confrontation exposes differences, forces us to make choices, makes clear what norms and values are central and what it is really all about. Confrontation comes in many forms. In this seventh issue of Yvi Magazine, there are three principal themes: confrontation with yourself, confrontation with another and confrontation with the way things are done. For many, their own body is a source of confrontation, in terms of health and in terms of beauty. In XXL, Dóra Pelczer reveals the battle with her own weight, the struggle to meet society’s ideal and the social pressure when this ideal is not achieved. Cara Phillips has portrayed the places where perfection can be realized by way of medical interventions: the spaces where plastic surgeons work.Shirin Fakhim’s Tehran Prostitutes, sculptures made of everyday objects and articles of clothing, employ absurd and sympathetic humour to broach the problems surrounding Persian prostitution. Few experiences are likely to affect us as deeply as the confrontation with death. Yet most deaths are almost secretive, far removed from our everyday lives. The confrontations with death and dying are perhaps our last taboos. In his impressive series, Life Before Death, Walter Schels portrays people shortly before the end of their lives and just after their deaths. Tristan Cai’s Physical Realities of Death series unfolds the life story of Toivo Laukkanen, with such themes as the value of life, the role of masculinity and death passing review. In Images of Happy People, Simon Menner presents photographs released by police, of potential victims of the convicted rapist and serial killer, Rodney James Alcala. They are cheerful young people, whom Alcala had studied and photographed with the most gruesome of intentions. Confrontation with intimidation and violence is the dominant tone in the work of Johannes Kahrs. By using images from our collective visual memories, it almost immediately evokes a familiar and uncomfortable feeling.In Tunesia, demonstrators successfully overthrew the 23-year autocratic regime of Ben Ali, with the demonstrators themselves taking the first photographs of the revolution and distributing them through the social media. Olivier Coulange uses these social channels to rephotograph the images, giving both a direct view of the rebellion and raising questions about the role of the photographer as author in the information exchange process.For a year, Teresa Margolles collected the Mexican daily newspaper, PM, every edition crammed with violence and sensationalism, with manslaughter, homicide and scantily clad models adorning its front pages. The work of the Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi brings together two extremes: clear traces of death, violence and suffering, with extremely concentrated, microscopically detailed and tranquil miniatures.Mari Bastashevski investigates kidnapping as a strategy in conflict, first applied on a major scale during the second Russian-Chechen war. Since then, it has grown to become a frequently applied tactic. Bastahevski tells the stories of the abductions and portrays the homes left behind by those who are missing. Adam Broomberg and Olivier Chanarin completed a project with and on the remarkable 1955 publication, War Primer, by Bertolt Brecht. War Primer 2 is the belated sequel. While Brecht’s War Primer was concerned with images of the Second World War, War Primer 2 focuses on the images of conflict generated by both sides of the so-called ‘War on Terror’. Peter Granser set out in search of traces of a landscape surrounding the village Gruorn, in the Swabian Alps, whose inhabitants were forcibly relocated in 1939. He documents the diverse history of an area that was used as a military training ground for over a century and declared a biosphere reserve in 2005.In exceptional circumstances, everything can change or disappear in an instant. The tsunami of 11 March 2011 wiped away a large section of the coast of Japan. When the cleanup of the devastation began, millions of private photographs and family albums were found. A group of young researchers devoted themselves to cleaning, drying and digitizing these photographs, in order to make them available to their owners, so that they could once again built up a bit of their own history and identities, along with their lives. The photographs, which together form an ideal family photo album, are a symbol of the deep connection between personal and collective memory. The economic crisis dealt heavy blows in many sectors, including the auto industry. As part of his trilogy, The Great Recession, Kirk Crippens portrayed the empty, cold remains of what were once bustling centres of activity: abandoned showrooms, empty offices, ghostly desolate spaces. The Chaology series, by Tess Hurrell, evolved out of her fascination for the visual power of the photographed explosion. Her source material includes images of Hiroshima, nuclear testing, the space shuttle disaster, burning oil and white phosphorus bombs.
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